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Tag - webcam scams

Avoiding Payment Scams On Webcam

Avoiding Webcam Scams

​If you’ve been a webcam model for long enough, you’ve probably encountered someone trying to scam you. In fact, even if you’ve just gotten started, you may have had someone try to scam you. Since they know that you’re new to camming, they assume that you’re more likely to fall for their scam.​ Many models can tell you horror stories of a scam or two that they’ve fallen for in the past. Some are worse than others. But if you fall for one, no matter what the degree, you’re gonna feel frustrated and upset. So to help prevent these scams, I’m gonna go over some of the most common ones that you may encounter during your camming career.

The majority of scams that you’ll encounter while on cam involve the scam artist getting you to do something for free, even though you think that they’re paying you to do it. The first thing that I want to say is that you should always follow your gut feeling. If something doesn’t feel right, that’s probably because it isn’t. Although these scam artists are usually very good at what they do, there’s always gonna be something there that doesn’t feel quite right or just seems off. If you sense that at all, look into it before giving anything away for free. There’s no harm in protecting yourself.

Even if someone promises to pay you, you should never perform a show or give out your content before getting paid. If they say that they don’t know if they can trust you, direct them to a site that has an escrow system. Extralunchmoney and Mygirlfund are examples. Both of these sites allow the member to create an escrow that holds the credits in limbo until you deliver the product. Once delivered, the member gets tiny screenshots of the content, and they can either approve or deny the escrow. That way it’s fair for everyone involved and no one has to worry about the other person not following through.

Never let people pay you via non adult friendly payment providers. PayPal is a perfect example of a payment provider that is not adult friendly. You may think it’s a good idea to use PayPal because you keep 100%, but it’s definitely not worth the risk. First off, your account will get shut down immediately if they find out you’re using it for adult services. Your funds will be held for months before you can withdraw them and you’ll never be able to have another PayPal account under your name again. Secondly, the customer could do what’s called a chargeback. And if they do, you cannot protest it since you weren’t allowed to use it for your adult activities in the first place. If a customer files a chargeback with their bank, the bank will cancel the payment that they made to you via PayPal and you won’t get paid. You’ll be asked to provide proof of what you offered in exchange for the PayPal money. And again, since it was an adult service, you won’t be able to provide that proof and you’ll have lost out on that money.

Another way people are scamming cam models is with fake emails. They design the emails to look like they’re coming from a company that you trust such as Amazon or Giftrocket, but really they aren’t. Instead they’re just fake emails designed to look like that, but don’t actually have any money attached to them that you can redeem. If you get something that you’re unsure of, make sure the funds go into your account before you do the cam show or before giving them your content in return.

The final thing is fake cam models and admins. Some guys will pretend to be another cam model in order to get your trust. They’ll do this to get to know more about you, or even to get free access to your private content. This happens a lot on Snapchat. You’ll think you’re adding a fellow cam model, when really it’s just a guy pretending to be a girl in order to add models for free. Before accepting anyone, do your research. Find that models real camming or Twitter account and DM them to see if that’s really them. Things like this happen while live on cam as well. You may get someone in your chat room that’s pretending to be an admin. They may ask you for certain private information. Never give anything like that out! A reputable company would never contact you in your chat room while you’re on cam. And there’s always ways set in place to know which accounts are actually admins or not.

Avoiding Webcam Scams

Avoid being scammed on webcam

Scammer. Scam-artist. Connoisseur of the Scam. Zé art of zé scam. No matter how you slice and dice it, the fact remains the same. If it seems to be too good to be true, it usually is.
Here’s the deal, kids. In this industry, we’re all going to be victim of the attempted scam. Granted, some of them are miserable excuses of an attempt and can hardly be considered “scamworthy” but once in a while, every so often you get the diamond in the rough. The one that either almost gets you, or (god forbid) actually does.

These guys are professionals. Not to be taken lightly. If you aren’t careful, they will come in and steal your sunshine, your panties, your content and your happiness. So, how do we help prevent these nasty predators from succeeding in their disgusting, freeloading ways?

First things first, never let your guard down. Scammers are always looking for a way to sneak in through the cracks and get you to trust them before they pull a bait and switch on you and get a bunch of free sh*t. There are going to be the ones who pretend to be “promoters” on social media and say things like “Hey babe, want a shout out? Can I get some personal nudes and maybe your snapchat in return?” (ugh. Go die, please.)

Then you’re going to get the “Paypal.BB? Amazon Gift Cards BB?” guys. The rare occasion does happen where these are really guys asking if you accept this form of payment, but more often than not scammers will send you fake gift cards, send you paypal and then report your account and get their money back, etc. Because of this it’s super important to be extremely informed about all the ways you do accept payment, and never waiver on what you’re comfortable with receiving until you do your research.

Then you’re going to get the guys who might even drop a little bit of money on you at first. These are the quintessential starting line-up of the game. They make you think they are legit by purchasing something, might be a big thing, might be a small thing.. And then they try to scam you out of your panties by saying that they will “send the money tomorrow.” Common phrases attached to these kinds are:

“I’m going to take care of you”
“I can’t use a credit card anymore because I don’t want it on my statement”
“I’ll send everything later, you know I’m good for it.”
“I got you.” “I see you” or any other variation on this stupid phrase.

Nope. No. No way, no how. These guys are trying to get you to lower your guard because hey, they’ve spent on you before, right? That must mean that they are always going to spend on you with their thousands of dollars. Even if they don’t right away.. It will pay off in the long haul, right? WRONG-O!

This brings me right into my second point. Do not bend the rules for anybody, unless you are 100% certain that they are legitimate, and even then… be wary. There are many a tale of the regular turned freeloader who pillaged and plundered his way through all the naïve camgirls by land and sea, so stay firm in your guidelines and make them either follow them or leave.

Always read through EVERYTHING (yes, even the fine print) and then if you’re not sure, google it and make sure. Check, and then double check….and then go back and check it again!
Basically, just make sure to cover all your bases and always be informed, because some of these guys are good. Like…Tom Hardy in everything he’s in kind of good. Not amateur, not easy to spot and will 9/10 times get the scam stamped with a big red COMPLETE.

Example time!!
Guy wants snapchat. He says he’s new at purchasing these kinds of things, acts like he tries to set up any accounts he needs to in order to pay and claims that it won’t work. Asks if he can send a gift card. He sends a “gift card” that asks for you to put in all of your legal and banking information and requires you to start an account in order to “redeem” the money. See where this is going?

This is a great scam because it provides the model with the illusion that he is trying hard to purchase content and is having a hard time. His goal here is to create a sense of guilt so that you will give in to accepting a gift card payment that you don’t normally accept. Then he slides in with one that will be extremely easy for him to either get your information from, or to get a refund on his money after he receives what he’s “paying” for.

Another popular scam is the “modeling agency” or the “magazine photographer” that will contact you on social media and say they are interested in shooting (or insert any other appropriate term for what they are claiming here)

Never be afraid to ask for references and samples of their work. It’s common practice to ask for references on an application, and why wouldn’t you want to fully screen anyone that you’re considering working with anyway? If they can’t provide references, past models they’ve worked with who you can reach out with, samples of their previous work or proof of what they are saying they can do for you, then move along. They are either scamming you or else they are unbelievably unprofessional, and you shouldn’t want to work with them anyway.
This could turn into a novel on it’s own if I kept going into details about all of the different ways that people have either tried with me or one of my cam friends, but suffice it to say that if you run your career like it’s a business, you will be able to avoid the majority of the scammers. Keep an eye out, be smart, be safe and if you do encounter a scammer, call them out on social media to warn the other models.